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Companion Planting: Vegetables and Flowers That Grow Well Together

vegetables and flowers that grow well together

Companion planting has been used for centuries to improve crop yields and ward off pests. The practice involves planting different types of crops in close proximity to one another so that they can benefit from each other's natural properties. In this blog post, we'll explore some of the best vegetables and flowers that grow well together.

Vegetables and Flowers That Grow Well Together

Tomatoes and Marigolds

Tomatoes and marigolds are a classic example of companion planting. Marigolds are known to repel nematodes, which can damage tomato roots. Additionally, the scent of marigolds is thought to deter other pests such as whiteflies and aphids. Plant marigolds around the perimeter of your tomato bed for best results.

Peppers and Petunias

Petunias are a great option to plant alongside peppers. They attract pollinators, like bees and butterflies, which can help increase pepper yields. Additionally, petunias release a chemical that repels aphids and other insects that can damage pepper plants.

Cucumbers and Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums are an edible flower that can help protect cucumber plants from pests. They contain a chemical that repels cucumber beetles and squash bugs. Nasturtiums also attract beneficial insects like ladybugs and predatory wasps that eat harmful pests.

Carrots and Chives

Chives are a great option to plant with carrots. They repel carrot flies, which can damage the roots of your carrots. Additionally, chives have antifungal properties that can help prevent diseases from affecting your carrot crop.

Lettuce and Alyssum

Alyssum is a small, low-growing flower that can be planted around the base of lettuce plants. It attracts pollinators like bees and butterflies, which can help increase lettuce yields. Additionally, alyssum releases a chemical that repels aphids and other pests that can damage your lettuce crop.

Beans and Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums are also a great option to plant with beans. They attract beneficial insects like bees and predatory wasps that eat harmful pests. Additionally, nasturtiums release a chemical that repels aphids and other pests that can damage bean plants.

Radishes and Spinach

Spinach is a cool-season crop that can be planted alongside radishes in the spring or fall. Radishes break up compacted soil, making it easier for spinach roots to grow deep and strong. Additionally, spinach provides shade for the radishes, which can help keep them cool during hot weather.

Corn and Sunflowers

Sunflowers are a tall, sturdy plant that can be planted alongside corn. They provide shade for the corn, which can help keep the soil cool and moist. Additionally, sunflowers attract beneficial insects like bees and predatory wasps that eat harmful pests.

Broccoli and Dill

Dill is a great option to plant with broccoli. It attracts beneficial insects like ladybugs and predatory wasps that eat harmful pests. Additionally, dill contains chemicals that repel cabbage worms, which can damage your broccoli crop.

Brussels Sprouts and Sage

Sage is a great option to plant with Brussels sprouts. It repels cabbage moths, which can damage your Brussels sprouts. Additionally, sage has antifungal properties that can help prevent diseases from affecting your crop.

Beets and Onions

Onions are a great option to plant with beets. They repel aphids, which can damage your beet crop. Additionally, onions have antifungal properties that can help prevent diseases from affecting your crop.

Cabbage and Chamomile

Chamomile is a great option to plant with cabbage. It attracts beneficial insects like ladybugs and predatory wasps that eat harmful pests. Additionally, chamomile contains chemicals that repel cabbage moths, which can damage your cabbage crop.

Eggplant and Calendula

Calendula is a great option to plant with eggplant. It attracts pollinators like bees and butterflies, which can help increase eggplant yields. Additionally, calendula releases a chemical that repels whiteflies and other pests that can damage eggplant plants.

Squash and Borage

Borage is a great option to plant with squash. It attracts beneficial insects like bees and predatory wasps that eat harmful pests. Additionally, borage contains chemicals that repel squash bugs, which can damage your squash crop.

Pumpkins and Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums are also a great option to plant with pumpkins. They attract beneficial insects like bees and predatory wasps that eat harmful pests. Additionally, nasturtiums release a chemical that repels squash bugs, which can damage your pumpkin crop.

Companion planting is a great way to improve crop yields and ward off pests without relying on harmful chemicals. By planting vegetables and flowers that grow well together, you can create a natural ecosystem in your garden that benefits all of your plants.

FAQs

Q: What is companion planting?

A: Companion planting involves planting different types of crops in close proximity to one another so that they can benefit from each other's natural properties.

Q: How does companion planting work?

A: Companion planting works by creating a natural ecosystem in your garden that benefits all of your plants. By planting vegetables and flowers that grow well together, you can improve crop yields and ward off pests without relying on harmful chemicals.

Q: What are some examples of vegetables and flowers that grow well together?

A: Some examples include tomatoes and marigolds, peppers and petunias, cucumbers and nasturtiums, carrots and chives, lettuce and alyssum, beans and nasturtiums, radishes and spinach, corn and sunflowers, broccoli and dill, Brussels sprouts and sage, beets and onions, cabbage and chamomile, eggplant and calendula, and squash and borage.

Q: How do I know which vegetables and flowers to plant together?

A: You can research which vegetables and flowers have complementary properties and plant them together. Additionally, trial and error is a great way to figure out what works best in your specific garden.

Q: How much space do I need for companion planting?

A: The amount of space you need will depend on the specific crops you're planting. Be sure to research how much space each crop needs before planting.

Q: Can I use companion planting in containers?

A: Yes, you can use companion planting in containers as long as you have enough space to accommodate all of your plants.

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