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Brussel Sprouts Companion Plants: A Comprehensive Guide

brussel sprouts companion plants

If you're a gardener, chances are you've heard of companion planting. This gardening practice involves growing different plants together for mutual benefit. When it comes to brussel sprouts, finding the right companion plants can be crucial for their growth and productivity. In this guide, we'll explore some of the best companion plants for brussel sprouts and how they can help your garden thrive.

Brussel Sprouts Companion Plants

When it comes to choosing companion plants for brussel sprouts, there are several factors to consider. First and foremost, you want plants that won't compete with your brussel sprouts for nutrients or space. You also want plants that will attract beneficial insects and deter pests.

1. Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums are a great companion plant for brussel sprouts because they attract aphids away from your brussel sprouts. These colorful flowers also add a pop of color to your garden and are edible too! Their peppery leaves and flowers are a great addition to salads and sandwiches.

2. Borage

Borage is another great companion plant for brussel sprouts. Its blue flowers attract bees and other pollinators while its leaves repel cabbage worms and other pests. Borage is also an excellent source of calcium and potassium, which can help improve soil quality.

3. Chamomile

Chamomile is a popular herb known for its calming properties, but it's also a great companion plant for brussel sprouts. Its small white flowers attract hoverflies, which feed on aphids and other pests. Chamomile also has a deep taproot that can help improve soil structure.

4. Dill

Dill is not only a flavorful herb but also an excellent companion plant for brussel sprouts. Its flowers attract beneficial insects such as ladybugs and lacewings, which feed on aphids and other pests. Dill also repels cabbage worms and can help improve soil health.

5. Garlic

Garlic is a natural pest repellent and can help keep pests away from your brussel sprouts. Its strong odor repels aphids, cabbage worms, and other pests. Garlic is also easy to grow and adds flavor to many dishes.

How to Plant Companion Plants with Brussel Sprouts

Now that you know some of the best companion plants for brussel sprouts, it's time to learn how to plant them together. The key is to plant them in a way that maximizes their benefits while minimizing competition.

1. Use Companion Planting Charts

Companion planting charts can help you determine which plants are compatible with brussel sprouts. These charts show which plants repel pests, attract beneficial insects, and provide other benefits.

2. Plan Your Garden Layout

When planning your garden layout, consider the spacing requirements of each plant. You want to make sure that your companion plants won't shade or overcrowd your brussel sprouts. Also, try to group plants with similar watering and sunlight needs together.

3. Rotate Your Crops

Rotating your crops is essential to prevent soil-borne diseases and pests. After harvesting your brussel sprouts, plant a different crop in that spot. This will help break the life cycle of pests and replenish nutrients in the soil.

FAQs

1. Can I plant brussel sprouts with tomatoes?

No, it's not recommended to plant brussel sprouts with tomatoes because they both require similar nutrients and can compete for resources.

2. What are some other vegetables that can be planted with brussel sprouts?

Other vegetables that can be planted with brussel sprouts include carrots, beets, and onions. These plants have different nutrient requirements and won't compete with your brussel sprouts.

3. Can I plant brussel sprouts in containers?

Yes, brussel sprouts can be grown in containers as long as the container is at least 18 inches deep and wide. Make sure to use a high-quality potting mix and fertilize regularly.

4. How often should I water my brussel sprouts?

Brussel sprouts require consistent moisture but don't like to be waterlogged. Water deeply once a week or more often during hot, dry weather.

5. When should I harvest my brussel sprouts?

Brussel sprouts are ready to harvest when the buds are firm and green. Harvest from the bottom of the plant up and remove any yellow leaves as you go.

In choosing the right companion plants for your brussel sprouts can help improve their growth and productivity. Nasturtiums, borage, chamomile, dill, and garlic are just a few examples of plants that can benefit your brussel sprouts. Remember to plan your garden layout carefully, rotate your crops, and water your brussel sprouts consistently for best results.

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