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Blanket Flower Companion Plants: The Best Options to Grow Together

blanket flower companion plants

If you're looking for a colorful and hardy perennial plant that can thrive in hot, dry conditions, look no further than the blanket flower. This attractive and easy-to-grow plant is known for its bright red, orange, and yellow flowers, which bloom from early summer until fall.

But what about companion plants? Can you grow blanket flowers with other plants that share similar growing conditions and aesthetic appeal? The answer is yes! In this article, we'll explore some of the best blanket flower companion plants that will help you create a stunning garden display.

The Best Blanket Flower Companion Plants

1. Coneflowers

Coneflowers are a natural choice to pair with blanket flowers, as they both love full sun and well-draining soil. These hardy perennials come in a range of colors, from pink and purple to white and yellow, and they attract pollinators like bees and butterflies.

How to Plant Coneflowers with Blanket Flowers

Plant coneflowers and blanket flowers together in a sunny spot with well-draining soil. Keep the soil moist but not waterlogged, especially during the first few weeks after planting. Mulch around the base of the plants to help retain moisture and suppress weeds.

2. Salvia

Salvia, also known as sage, is a beautiful and fragrant herb that makes an excellent companion plant for blanket flowers. Like blanket flowers, most salvias prefer full sun and well-draining soil. They also attract hummingbirds and butterflies.

How to Plant Salvia with Blanket Flowers

Plant salvia and blanket flowers together in a sunny spot with well-draining soil. Water the plants regularly, especially during hot, dry weather. Prune the salvia back in early spring to encourage new growth and bushier plants.

3. Black-eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan is a popular companion plant for blanket flowers, as it also loves full sun and well-draining soil. These bright and cheerful perennials have yellow or orange petals with dark centers, making them an eye-catching addition to any garden.

How to Plant Black-eyed Susan with Blanket Flowers

Plant black-eyed Susan and blanket flowers together in a sunny spot with well-draining soil. Water the plants regularly, especially during the first few weeks after planting. Deadhead the spent blooms to encourage continuous flowering.

4. Lavender

Lavender is a fragrant and attractive herb that pairs well with blanket flowers. Both plants prefer full sun and well-draining soil, and they can help repel pests like mosquitoes and deer.

How to Plant Lavender with Blanket Flowers

Plant lavender and blanket flowers together in a sunny spot with well-draining soil. Water the plants regularly, but avoid getting water on the leaves or flowers of the lavender, as this can cause mildew. Prune the lavender back in early spring to promote new growth.

5. Sedum

Sedum, also known as stonecrop, is a low-maintenance succulent that makes a great companion plant for blanket flowers. These plants prefer full sun and well-draining soil, and they can tolerate drought and heat.

How to Plant Sedum with Blanket Flowers

Plant sedum and blanket flowers together in a sunny spot with well-draining soil. Water the plants sparingly, as too much water can cause root rot. Fertilize the plants lightly in the spring with a balanced fertilizer.

6. Ornamental Grasses

Ornamental grasses, such as fountain grass and switchgrass, can add height, texture, and movement to a garden display that includes blanket flowers. These plants prefer full sun and well-draining soil, and they can provide winter interest after the flowers have faded.

How to Plant Ornamental Grasses with Blanket Flowers

Plant ornamental grasses and blanket flowers together in a sunny spot with well-draining soil. Water the plants regularly during the first few weeks after planting. Cut back the dead foliage in late winter or early spring before new growth appears.

Blanket flowers are a hardy and colorful perennial plant that can make a stunning addition to any garden display. By pairing them with other plants that share similar growing conditions and aesthetic appeal, you can create a beautiful and cohesive design. Consider trying out some of these companion plants to enhance your garden's beauty and diversity.

FAQs

1. Are blanket flowers invasive?

No, blanket flowers are not considered invasive. They are a native wildflower in North America, and they do not spread aggressively or choke out other plants.

2. Can I grow blanket flowers in containers?

Yes, blanket flowers can be grown in containers as long as the container is large enough to accommodate their root system and has adequate drainage. Use a high-quality potting mix and water the plants regularly.

3. How often should I fertilize my blanket flowers?

Blanket flowers do not require frequent fertilization. Apply a slow-release fertilizer in the spring, and then again in mid-summer if desired. Avoid over-fertilizing, as this can cause excessive leaf growth at the expense of flower production.

4. How do I deadhead blanket flowers?

To deadhead blanket flowers, simply pinch or cut off the spent blooms with a pair of scissors or pruners. This will encourage the plant to produce more flowers and prevent it from going to seed too early.

5. Can blanket flowers survive winter?

Yes, blanket flowers are hardy perennials that can survive winter in most regions. However, they may require some extra care in colder climates, such as mulching around the base of the plants to protect their roots from freezing.

Great, I'd be happy to help you with that! So let's with some basic information about blanket flowers.

Blanket flowers, also known as Gaillardia, are a popular choice for gardeners due to their bright and cheerful daisy-like blooms, which come in shades of red, yellow, and orange. They are typically easy to grow and maintain, making them a great option for both novice and experienced gardeners.

When it comes to companion planting, there are several species that pair well with blanket flowers. One great option is yarrow, which provides a lovely contrast to the vibrant hues of blanket flowers with its delicate white or pink blooms. Yarrow is also drought-tolerant and attracts beneficial insects like ladybugs and lacewings, making it a great addition to any garden.

Another good choice is salvia, which has tall spiky blooms that complement the round shape of blanket flowers nicely. Salvia is also a favorite of hummingbirds and butterflies, making it a great way to attract these beautiful pollinators to your garden.

Other potential companion plants for blanket flowers include coreopsis, lavender, and penstemon, among others. Each of these species offers unique benefits, from drought tolerance to pest resistance to color contrast.

In planting blanket flowers alongside other species can enhance the beauty and health of your garden. Whether you choose yarrow, salvia, or another compatible plant, you're sure to enjoy the colorful and vibrant display that results from thoughtful companion planting. Sure thing! How can I assist you today?

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