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Borage Companion Plants: The Ultimate Guide

borage companion plants

Borage Companion Plants:

Are you looking for a plant that can attract pollinators, fix nitrogen in the soil, and improve the flavor of nearby vegetables? Look no further than borage! This beautiful blue flowering herb is not only a great addition to any garden but also has many benefits when grown alongside other plants. In this article, we will discuss the best borage companion plants and how they can help your garden thrive.

The Benefits of Borage Companion Plants

Borage is a fantastic companion plant because it attracts bees, butterflies, and other beneficial insects to your garden. These pollinators are essential for the health and productivity of your crops. Additionally, borage has deep roots that can help break up compacted soil and bring nutrients to the surface. Finally, borage contains compounds that can enhance the flavor of tomatoes, strawberries, and other fruits and vegetables grown nearby.

15 Best Borage Companion Plants

1. Tomatoes

One of the best companion plants for borage is tomatoes. Borage helps repel tomato hornworms, which can devastate tomato plants if left unchecked. Additionally, borage's roots can help prevent soil-borne diseases that affect tomatoes.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your tomato plants, spacing them 18-24 inches apart. Be sure to give the tomatoes plenty of room to grow by staking or trellising them.

2. Cucumber

Cucumbers and borage make great companions because they both attract bees and other pollinators to your garden. Additionally, borage can help prevent cucumber beetles from attacking your plants.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds around your cucumber plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the cucumbers plenty of room to grow by trellising or using a cage.

3. Strawberries

Borage and strawberries are a match made in heaven. Borage attracts bees, which are essential for pollinating strawberries. Additionally, borage's roots can help prevent soil-borne diseases that affect strawberries.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your strawberry plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the strawberries plenty of room to grow by using a raised bed or mounding the soil around them.

4. Squash

Squash and borage are great companions because they both attract pollinators to your garden. Additionally, borage can help repel squash bugs, which can devastate squash plants if left unchecked.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds around your squash plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the squash plenty of room to grow by using a trellis or allowing them to sprawl.

5. Beans

Beans and borage make great companions because borage's deep roots can fix nitrogen in the soil, which beans need for healthy growth. Additionally, borage attracts bees, which are essential for pollinating bean flowers.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your bean plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the beans plenty of room to grow by using a trellis or allowing them to sprawl.

6. Peppers

Peppers and borage are great companions because borage can help repel harmful insects that attack pepper plants. Additionally, borage attracts bees, which are essential for pollinating pepper flowers.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds around your pepper plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the peppers plenty of room to grow by staking or trellising them.

7. Eggplant

Eggplant and borage make great companions because borage's deep roots can break up compacted soil, improving drainage and nutrient availability for eggplant. Additionally, borage attracts bees, which are essential for pollinating eggplant flowers.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your eggplant plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the eggplants plenty of room to grow by staking or trellising them.

8. Lettuce

Lettuce and borage make great companions because borage attracts beneficial insects that help control aphids, which can damage lettuce plants. Additionally, borage's deep roots can help prevent soil-borne diseases that affect lettuce.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your lettuce plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the lettuce plenty of room to grow by thinning seedlings as needed.

9. Radish

Radishes and borage make great companions because borage attracts bees, which are essential for pollinating radish flowers. Additionally, borage can help repel flea beetles, which can damage radish leaves.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds around your radish plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the radishes plenty of room to grow by thinning seedlings as needed.

10. Carrots

Carrots and borage make great companions because borage attracts beneficial insects that help control carrot rust flies, which can damage carrot roots. Additionally, borage's deep roots can help prevent soil-borne diseases that affect carrots.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your carrot plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the carrots plenty of room to grow by thinning seedlings as needed.

11. Corn

Corn and borage make great companions because borage's deep roots can help prevent soil erosion and nutrient leaching caused by heavy rain. Additionally, borage attracts bees, which are essential for pollinating corn flowers.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your corn plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the corn plenty of room to grow by planting in blocks rather than rows.

12. Melons

Melons and borage make great companions because borage's deep roots can help break up compacted soil, improving drainage and nutrient availability for melons. Additionally, borage attracts bees, which are essential for pollinating melon flowers.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds around your melon plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the melons plenty of room to grow by trellising or allowing them to sprawl.

13. Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts and borage make great companions because borage attracts beneficial insects that help control aphids, which can damage brussels sprout leaves. Additionally, borage's deep roots can help prevent soil-borne diseases that affect brussels sprouts.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your brussels sprouts plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the brussels sprouts plenty of room to grow by spacing them 18-24 inches apart.

14. Broccoli

Broccoli and borage make great companions because borage attracts beneficial insects that help control aphids, which can damage broccoli leaves. Additionally, borage's deep roots can help prevent soil-borne diseases that affect broccoli.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds around your broccoli plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the broccoli plenty of room to grow by spacing them 18-24 inches apart.

15. Kale

Kale and borage make great companions because borage attracts beneficial insects that help control aphids, which can damage kale leaves. Additionally, borage's deep roots can help prevent soil-borne diseases that affect kale.

How to Plant:

Plant borage seeds directly in the ground around your kale plants, spacing them 12-18 inches apart. Be sure to give the kale plenty of room to grow by spacing them 18-24 inches apart.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q1: What is borage?

A1: Borage is a plant with blue flowers that is often grown as an herb. It is native to the Mediterranean region but is now found throughout the world.

Q2: What are the benefits of growing borage?

A2: Borage attracts pollinators, fixes nitrogen in the soil, and can enhance the flavor of nearby fruits and vegetables.

Q3: How do I plant borage?

A3: Borage seeds can be planted directly in the ground in the spring after the last frost. They should be spaced 12-24 inches apart and planted 1/4 inch deep.

Q4: Can I eat borage?

A4: Yes, borage leaves and flowers are edible and can be used in salads or as a garnish.

Q5: Are there any plants that should not be grown with borage?

A5: Borage should not be grown with fennel, as the two plants can cross-pollinate and produce bitter-tasting seeds.

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