Skip to content Skip to sidebar Skip to footer

Enhance Your Garden with These Fountain Grass Companion Plants

fountain grass companion plants

What are Fountain Grass Companion Plants?

Fountain grass is an ornamental grass that has become increasingly popular among gardeners over the years. The plant's graceful, arching foliage and fluffy, bottlebrush-like flowers make it an attractive addition to gardens, borders, and containers alike. But what exactly are fountain grass companion plants?

In simple terms, companion plants are those that grow well alongside another plant, complementing its beauty while also providing support, shade, or protection. In the case of fountain grass, companion plants can enhance its visual appeal, provide contrasting textures and colors, or attract beneficial insects and pollinators.

Here are some fountain grass companion plants that you can consider adding to your garden:

1. Sedum 'Autumn Joy'

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' is a popular succulent plant that pairs well with fountain grass. Its fleshy, blue-green leaves and large, pink flower clusters create a striking contrast against the slender, green blades of fountain grass. Moreover, sedums are drought-tolerant and low-maintenance, making them ideal for busy gardeners.

How to Grow Sedum 'Autumn Joy'?

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' prefers well-draining soil and full sun exposure. Plant it in spring or fall, spacing each plant about 18-24 inches apart. Water regularly during the first growing season, then reduce watering to once a week or less. Deadhead spent blooms to encourage more flowers.

How to Pair Sedum 'Autumn Joy' with Fountain Grass?

Plant sedum around the base of fountain grass or in clusters nearby. Consider adding other succulents or drought-tolerant plants, such as yarrow or lavender, for a cohesive look.

2. Black-Eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan is a cheerful perennial that blooms from midsummer to fall. Its bright yellow petals and dark centers create a stunning contrast against the feathery, burgundy plumes of fountain grass. Moreover, black-eyed Susans attract butterflies and bees, which help pollinate nearby plants.

How to Grow Black-Eyed Susan?

Black-eyed Susan prefers well-draining soil and full sun exposure. Plant it in spring or fall, spacing each plant about 18-24 inches apart. Water regularly during the first growing season, then reduce watering to once a week or less. Deadhead spent blooms to encourage more flowers.

How to Pair Black-Eyed Susan with Fountain Grass?

Plant black-eyed Susan in clusters or drifts near fountain grass, leaving enough space for both plants to grow. Consider adding other pollinator-friendly plants, such as coneflower or bee balm, for a vibrant garden bed.

3. Russian Sage

Russian sage is a fragrant perennial that produces silvery-blue leaves and lavender-blue flowers. Its airy, upright habit complements the arching form of fountain grass, creating a harmonious display. Moreover, Russian sage repels deer and rabbits, making it a useful plant for landscapes with wildlife.

How to Grow Russian Sage?

Russian sage prefers well-draining soil and full sun exposure. Plant it in spring or fall, spacing each plant about 24-36 inches apart. Water regularly during the first growing season, then reduce watering to once a week or less. Prune back in late winter or early spring to promote new growth.

How to Pair Russian Sage with Fountain Grass?

Plant Russian sage near or behind fountain grass, allowing its silvery foliage and lavender-blue flowers to peek through. Consider adding other drought-tolerant plants, such as butterfly weed or coreopsis, for a colorful mix.

4. Japanese Bloodgrass

Japanese bloodgrass is an eye-catching ornamental grass that features red-tipped leaves that turn burgundy-red in the fall. Its compact size and bold color make it an ideal complement to fountain grass, especially when planted en masse. Moreover, Japanese bloodgrass is deer-resistant and low-maintenance.

How to Grow Japanese Bloodgrass?

Japanese bloodgrass prefers well-draining soil and full sun exposure. Plant it in spring or fall, spacing each plant about 8-12 inches apart. Water regularly during the first growing season, then reduce watering to once a week or less. Cut back in late winter or early spring to encourage new growth.

How to Pair Japanese Bloodgrass with Fountain Grass?

Plant Japanese bloodgrass in groups or rows next to fountain grass, creating a vivid contrast between the red and green hues. Consider adding other grasses or foliage plants, such as variegated hosta or purple ninebark, for added interest.

5. Allium 'Millenium'

Allium 'Millenium' is a unique perennial that produces round, lavender-pink flowers atop tall stems. Its globe-like blooms add texture and dimension to garden beds, while also attracting bees and butterflies. Moreover, Allium 'Millenium' is deer-resistant and easy to grow.

How to Grow Allium 'Millenium'?

Allium 'Millenium' prefers well-draining soil and full sun exposure. Plant it in spring or fall, spacing each bulb about 6-8 inches apart. Water regularly during the first growing season, then reduce watering to once a week or less. Deadhead spent blooms to prevent self-seeding.

How to Pair Allium 'Millenium' with Fountain Grass?

Plant Allium 'Millenium' in groups near fountain grass, creating a focal point in your garden bed. Consider adding other pollinator-friendly plants, such as salvia or catmint, for a fragrant and colorful display.

In summary, fountain grass companion plants can enhance the visual appeal of your garden while also providing functional benefits. Whether you're looking for contrasting colors, textural variety, or wildlife attraction, there are plenty of options to choose from. Just remember to consider each plant's growing requirements and aesthetics before planting them together.

FAQs

Q1. Can I grow fountain grass in containers?

Yes, fountain grass can thrive in containers as long as they have adequate drainage and receive at least six hours of sunlight per day.

Q2. Do fountain grasses require pruning?

Yes, fountain grasses benefit from pruning in late winter or early spring to remove dead foliage and promote new growth. However, avoid cutting back too much of the plant, as this may stunt its growth.

Q3. What are some other ornamental grasses that pair well with fountain grass?

Some other ornamental grasses that complement fountain grass include blue oat grass, feather reed grass, and switchgrass.

Q4. How often should I water my fountain grass?

Fountain grasses prefer moderate watering, meaning that they should be watered deeply once a week or as needed, depending on the weather and soil conditions.

Q5. Can I use fountain grass as a privacy screen?

While fountain grass can provide some screening when planted en masse, it is not an ideal plant for creating a dense privacy hedge. Consider using taller grasses or shrubs instead.

Post a Comment for "Enhance Your Garden with These Fountain Grass Companion Plants"