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Discovering the Best Sarcococca Companion Plants: A Guide

sarcococca companion plants

Sarcococca Companion Plants - What are They?

If you're looking for plants that will complement your Sarcococca shrubs, you've come to the right place. Sarcococca, also known as sweet box, is an evergreen shrub with glossy, dark green leaves and fragrant white flowers that bloom in winter. It's a great addition to any garden, but it can be enhanced by planting it alongside other plants that share its characteristics.

The Top 15 Sarcococca Companion Plants

Here are the top 15 plants that pair well with Sarcococca:

1. Camellia

Camellias are evergreen shrubs that produce large, showy flowers in shades of pink, red, and white. They bloom in late winter and early spring, which makes them a great companion plant for Sarcococca.

Why They Work Well Together:

Camellias and Sarcococca both prefer partial shade and acidic soil. They also have similar growth habits, so they won't compete with each other for space.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your Camellias. Make sure the soil is well-drained and slightly acidic (pH of 5.5-6.5). Dig a hole that's twice the size of the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

2. Hellebores

Hellebores, also known as Lenten roses, are evergreen perennials that bloom in late winter and early spring. They have nodding, cup-shaped flowers in shades of pink, purple, and white.

Why They Work Well Together:

Hellebores and Sarcococca both prefer partial shade and moist, well-drained soil. They also have similar growth habits, so they won't compete with each other for space.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your Hellebores. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

3. Snowdrops

Snowdrops are bulbous perennials that bloom in late winter and early spring. They have drooping, bell-shaped flowers that are white with green markings.

Why They Work Well Together:

Snowdrops and Sarcococca both bloom in late winter and early spring, so they'll provide a burst of color when other plants are still dormant. They also prefer similar growing conditions: partial shade and moist, well-drained soil.

How to Plant:

Plant snowdrop bulbs in the fall, about 3 inches deep and 3-4 inches apart. They prefer moist, well-drained soil in partial shade. Water thoroughly after planting.

4. Cyclamen

Cyclamen are low-growing perennials that bloom in autumn and winter. They have heart-shaped leaves and flowers in shades of pink, red, and white.

Why They Work Well Together:

Cyclamen and Sarcococca both prefer partial shade and moist, well-drained soil. They also have similar growing habits, so they won't compete with each other for space.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your Cyclamen. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

5. Ferns

Ferns are shade-loving plants that come in a variety of shapes and sizes. They have delicate fronds that add texture and interest to any garden.

Why They Work Well Together:

Ferns and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist soil. Ferns also help retain moisture in the soil, which can benefit Sarcococca.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets partial to full shade for your ferns. Make sure the soil is moist and well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

6. Heucheras

Heucheras, also known as coral bells, are evergreen perennials that come in a range of colors, from green to purple to bronze.

Why They Work Well Together:

Heucheras and Sarcococca both prefer partial shade and well-drained soil. Heucheras also provide a nice contrast to Sarcococca with their colorful foliage.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your Heucheras. Make sure the soil is well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

7. Hostas

Hostas are shade-loving perennials that come in a variety of sizes and colors. They have large, textured leaves and produce spikes of white or lavender flowers in summer.

Why They Work Well Together:

Hostas and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist, well-drained soil. They also have similar growth habits, so they won't compete with each other for space.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets partial to full shade for your hostas. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

8. Pulmonarias

Pulmonarias, also known as lungworts, are shade-loving perennials that bloom in late winter and early spring. They have spotted leaves and flowers in shades of pink, blue, and purple.

Why They Work Well Together:

Pulmonarias and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist soil. Pulmonarias also provide early color to the garden when other plants are still dormant.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your pulmonarias. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

9. Tiarellas

Tiarellas, also known as foamflowers, are shade-loving perennials that have small, heart-shaped leaves and spikes of white or pink flowers.

Why They Work Well Together:

Tiarellas and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist, well-drained soil. Tiarellas also have similar growth habits, so they won't compete with each other for space.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your tiarellas. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

10. Epimediums

Epimediums, also known as barrenworts, are shade-loving perennials that have delicate, spider-like flowers in shades of pink, orange, and yellow.

Why They Work Well Together:

Epimediums and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist soil. Epimediums also provide early color to the garden when other plants are still dormant.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your epimediums. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

11. Brunneras

Brunneras, also known as Siberian bugloss, are shade-loving perennials that have heart-shaped leaves and clusters of blue or pink flowers.

Why They Work Well Together:

Brunneras and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist soil. Brunneras also have similar growth habits, so they won't compete with each other for space.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your brunneras. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

12. Astilbes

Astilbes are shade-loving perennials that have feathery plumes of flowers in shades of pink, red, and white.

Why They Work Well Together:

Astilbes and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist soil. Astilbes also provide a nice contrast to Sarcococca with their colorful blooms.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your astilbes. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

13. Bleeding Hearts

Bleeding hearts are shade-loving perennials that have heart-shaped leaves and drooping, heart-shaped flowers in shades of pink and white.

Why They Work Well Together:

Bleeding hearts and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist soil. Bleeding hearts also provide early color to the garden when other plants are still dormant.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your bleeding hearts. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

14. Japanese Forest Grass

Japanese forest grass, also known as Hakonechloa, is a shade-loving grass that has arching, green or gold leaves.

Why They Work Well Together:

Japanese forest grass and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist soil. Japanese forest grass also provides a nice contrast to Sarcococca with its textured foliage.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your Japanese forest grass. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

15. Ajugas

Ajugas, also known as bugleweeds, are low-growing perennials that have spikes of blue or purple flowers in spring and summer.

Why They Work Well Together:

Ajugas and Sarcococca both prefer partial to full shade and moist soil. Ajugas also provide a nice contrast to Sarcococca with their colorful flowers.

How to Plant:

Choose a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade for your ajugas. Make sure the soil is moist but well-drained. Dig a hole that's slightly larger than the root ball and mix some compost or peat moss into the soil. Water thoroughly after planting.

FAQs - Your Questions Answered

Q1: Can I plant Sarcococca with other evergreens?

A: Absolutely! Sarcococca pairs well with other evergreen shrubs like boxwood, holly, and yew.

Q2: Do Sarcococca companion plants have to bloom in winter?

A: Not necessarily. While plants that bloom in winter can provide early color to the garden, any shade-loving plant that prefers moist, well-drained soil can be a good companion for Sarcococca.

Q3: What's the best soil pH for Sarcococca and its companion plants?

A: Sarcococca and most of its companions prefer slightly acidic soil with a pH of 5.5-6.5.

Q4: Can I grow Sarcococca in full sun?

A: Sarcococca prefers partial to full shade, so it's not recommended to grow it in full sun.

Q5: How often should I water my Sarcococca and its companion plants?

A: Sarcococca and its companion plants prefer moist but well-drained soil. Water them thoroughly once or twice a week, depending on your climate and soil conditions.

In planting Sarcococca alongside other shade-loving plants can enhance its beauty and create a stunning winter garden. From Camellias to Ajugas, there are many options to choose from. Just make sure to consider each plant's growing requirements before planting them together. With the right care and attention, your Sarcococca and its companion plants will thrive and provide year-round interest to your garden.

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