Skip to content Skip to sidebar Skip to footer

10 Companion Plants for Verbena Bonariensis

companion plants for verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis is an excellent plant to add height and color to any garden. With its long, slender stems and vibrant purple flowers, it can make a statement in any landscape design. However, like most plants, it benefits from having companion plants nearby. Companion planting is the practice of planting different species together to improve growth, repel pests, and provide other benefits. In this article, we will explore 10 of the best companion plants for verbena bonariensis.

Companion Plants for Verbena Bonariensis

1. Salvia nemorosa

Salvia nemorosa, also known as woodland sage, is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis. This perennial plant grows to be about 18 inches tall and has blue-purple flowers that bloom in early summer. It is drought-tolerant and attracts butterflies and bees, making it an excellent choice for a pollinator-friendly garden.

Why They Work Together

Salvia nemorosa has a similar height to verbena bonariensis, which makes them a perfect match. The blue-purple color of the salvia flowers complements the purple flowers of the verbena bonariensis beautifully. Additionally, both plants require similar growing conditions, including full sun and well-drained soil.

2. Echinacea purpurea

Echinacea purpurea, also known as purple coneflower, is a popular perennial plant that produces pink-purple flowers from mid-summer to early fall. It is native to North America and is an excellent choice for attracting pollinators to your garden.

Why They Work Together

Echinacea purpurea is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it attracts bees and butterflies, which are essential pollinators for both plants. The pink-purple flowers of the echinacea also complement the purple flowers of the verbena bonariensis nicely.

3. Nepeta × faassenii

Nepeta × faassenii, also known as catmint, is a low-maintenance perennial plant that produces lavender-blue flowers from late spring to early fall. It is drought-tolerant and attracts bees and butterflies.

Why They Work Together

Nepeta × faassenii is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it has a similar height and growth habit. The lavender-blue flowers of the nepeta complement the purple flowers of the verbena bonariensis beautifully. Additionally, both plants require similar growing conditions, including full sun and well-drained soil.

4. Achillea millefolium

Achillea millefolium, also known as yarrow, is a hardy perennial plant that produces clusters of white or pink flowers from mid-summer to early fall. It is drought-tolerant and attracts butterflies and bees.

Why They Work Together

Achillea millefolium is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it has a similar height and growth habit. The white or pink flowers of the achillea provide a nice contrast to the purple flowers of the verbena bonariensis. Additionally, yarrow is known to repel some harmful insects, making it a useful plant to have in any garden.

5. Stipa tenuissima

Stipa tenuissima, also known as Mexican feather grass, is a graceful ornamental grass that produces delicate, feathery plumes in the summer. It is drought-tolerant and low-maintenance.

Why They Work Together

Stipa tenuissima is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it provides a nice textural contrast to the slender stems of the verbena bonariensis. The feathery plumes of the grass sway beautifully in the breeze, adding movement and interest to any garden design.

6. Eryngium planum

Eryngium planum, also known as sea holly, is a striking perennial plant with spiky blue-purple flowers that bloom in mid-summer. It is drought-tolerant and attracts bees and butterflies.

Why They Work Together

Eryngium planum is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it has a similar height and growth habit. The spiky blue-purple flowers of the eryngium provide a nice contrast to the slender stems of the verbena bonariensis. Additionally, both plants require similar growing conditions, including full sun and well-drained soil.

7. Rudbeckia fulgida

Rudbeckia fulgida, also known as black-eyed Susan, is a popular perennial plant that produces bright yellow-orange flowers from mid-summer to early fall. It is native to North America and attracts butterflies and bees.

Why They Work Together

Rudbeckia fulgida is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it provides a nice color contrast to the purple flowers of the verbena bonariensis. The bright yellow-orange flowers of the rudbeckia are eye-catching and add a pop of color to any garden design.

8. Sedum spectabile

Sedum spectabile, also known as stonecrop or ice plant, is a low-maintenance perennial plant that produces clusters of pink flowers from late summer to early fall. It is drought-tolerant and attracts butterflies and bees.

Why They Work Together

Sedum spectabile is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it has a similar height and growth habit. The pink flowers of the sedum complement the purple flowers of the verbena bonariensis nicely. Additionally, sedum is known for its ability to attract beneficial insects like ladybugs and lacewings.

9. Monarda didyma

Monarda didyma, also known as bee balm or bergamot, is a hardy perennial plant that produces clusters of bright red or pink flowers from mid-summer to early fall. It is native to North America and attracts bees and butterflies.

Why They Work Together

Monarda didyma is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it provides a nice color contrast to the purple flowers of the verbena bonariensis. The bright red or pink flowers of the monarda are eye-catching and add a pop of color to any garden design. Additionally, both plants require similar growing conditions, including full sun and well-drained soil.

10. Lavandula angustifolia

Lavandula angustifolia, also known as English lavender, is a fragrant perennial plant that produces spikes of purple-blue flowers in mid-summer. It is drought-tolerant and attracts bees and butterflies.

Why They Work Together

Lavandula angustifolia is an excellent companion plant for verbena bonariensis because it has a similar height and growth habit. The purple-blue flowers of the lavender complement the purple flowers of the verbena bonariensis beautifully. Additionally, both plants require similar growing conditions, including full sun and well-drained soil.


In verbena bonariensis is a beautiful addition to any garden, but it benefits from having companion plants nearby. Salvia nemorosa, echinacea purpurea, nepeta × faassenii, achillea millefolium, stipa tenuissima, eryngium planum, rudbeckia fulgida, sedum spectabile, monarda didyma, and lavandula angustifolia are all excellent companion plants for verbena bonariensis. They provide color contrast, attract beneficial insects, and have similar growing conditions, making them a perfect match for verbena bonariensis.

FAQs

1. What is companion planting?

Companion planting is the practice of planting different species together to improve growth, repel pests, and provide other benefits.

2. Why is companion planting important?

Companion planting is important because it can improve the health and productivity of your garden. Companion plants can help repel harmful insects, attract beneficial insects, and improve soil health.

3. How do I choose companion plants for my garden?

When choosing companion plants for your garden, consider the growing conditions of each plant, such as soil type, light exposure, and water needs. Also, consider the colors and textures of each plant to ensure they complement each other.

4. Can companion planting help reduce pest problems in my garden?

Yes, companion planting can help reduce pest problems in your garden. Many companion plants are known to repel harmful insects, which can help protect your crops.

5. Are there any plants that should not be planted together?

Yes, there are some plants that should not be planted together. For example, planting tomatoes and potatoes together can increase the risk of disease. It's important to do your research before planting to ensure you are choosing compatible plants.

Post a Comment for "10 Companion Plants for Verbena Bonariensis"